3 tools for your Linux shell that can change your life

- Linux, Open Source

It is since a lot that I want to write something about my VIm configuration but I think that is too soon, so I chosen to talk about something that can be useful for everyone.

Everyone on Linux of course.

We will see 3 tools for CLI that I usually forget to use but when I remember hat I have them they change a lot my workflow. I have a common problem (I guess) between developers, remember hotkeys and commands, so the only way is using it or writing articles about it.

TLDR

The official and first package is based on NodeJS but I avoid every tool for CLI written in that language.

Luckily there are a lot of developers that seems think like me and they made a more light and simple alternative in pure bash.

Basically tldr (the bash version) is a command to avoid to look on internet for common usages of other linux commands. As example dd or curl!

With a simple command you have a recap of the most used parameters with real examples.

Very handy for who like me don’t remember them.

HowDoI

This become quite famous a long time ago because borned after a XKCD comic for a guy that wasn’t remembering a command.

This tool is similar to the previous one because pick the first most famous response about something on StackOverflow.

The point is that is very helpful with code, I usually use to get the jquery ready code because I never remember it but think about everything you want.

AutoJump

It is quite boring write a path and use the tab for autocomplete. Why not find a way where the shell learn your common parameter and you can write few letters of that and magically jump in?

This tool, is available in a lot of distro (in case of Debian require a little bit of editing of your bashrc).

Conclusion

I want to conclude this article with my collection of my personal scripts, made for my use and also with by bashrc and vim settings.

 

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All the stuff released in this website, where the author is Daniele Scasciafratte, is under the GPL 2.0 license except when the resources have their licenses.

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